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Top Tips for Selling Your Horse

Penny Newbold has sold a few horses in her time – she passes on some tips to help would-be sellers attract prospective buyers…

Top Tips for Selling Your Horse

So you’ve made the big decision to find a new loving home for your beloved four-legged friend. There are going to be (hopefully!) lots of people wanting to test your horse out.

So try and make sure your horse:

* Is accustomed to different riders, different handlers and different locations.

* Is able to be lunged.

* Make sure the ad is professionally worded, with as much detail included as possible, such as levels of performance, training, ground manners, temperament as well as the essential of colour, height, age etc.

* Photos must be excellent!

A good photo will make the difference between having one enquiry or 10. Make sure you can clearly see conformation in any side-on shots and preferable include a pic of your horse actually doing what it is you are stating he or she is capable of doing. (For example, if your horse is a jumper, a jumping pic is essential, likewise if it is a campdrafter, dressage queen or sporting specialist, it is essential to show your horse’s capabilities.)

* Make sure you have (or have access to) appropriate facilities where someone can try the horse such as an arena, riding area, or roundyard.

* Take video footage of your horse performing (or at least doing something you’re saying that he or she does/has done!)

* Ideally have video footage of him being shod/clipped/teeth done or vaccinated.

* Know the breeding/bloodlines and preferably have copies of registration papers/performance cards.

* Have notes/records of worming/vet history/injuries etc – and it’s worth being honest or it will come back to bite you!

* Is any gear included? Be sure to make it clear what is and isn’t included in the sale.

Make sure the price is right!

Research the current market for your horse.

Consider your horse’s strengths and experience as well as breed and age, then look into what horses, similar to yours, are selling for. And this is the time to be honest with yourself! If in doubt, get advice from a professional who regularly sells horses in your market.

If you overestimate the value of your horse it will take longer to sell and then if you decide to reduce the price, realistic, prospective purchasers that may have been seriously interested, may well have moved on to other options.

For more tips on buying or selling your horse and how to ensure your sale goes to plan, see our HubVibes articles (insert links) How to find the Perfect Pony Clubber and What Laws Apply When Selling a Horse. (Articles are in March 17 issue)